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What Really Drives Up Health Insurance Premiums

July 19, 2013 in Health Insurance

Every year it seems that we are paying more and more for health insurance. According to an informative infographic Carrington College, the health care costs in the United States have grown 2.4 percent faster than the GDP, meaning that as of 2010, people were paying more than 8,000 dollars per person, and that money represented about 18 percent of the United States’ economy.

There are several factors, which have contributed to the rising price of health insurance. For example, one benefit which has had unexpected costs is the medical technology that is now being used. The technology that is used to diagnose and treat illnesses accounts for at least 50 percent of the growth of medical expenditures since the 1960s, putting an increased burden on the people paying for their health insurance.

Another factor that affects the health insurance rate for most people is the failure to use a primary care physician. With more people only going to see doctors for emergencies, there is actually less money being spent on primary care doctors, a practice which has been shown to lower costs. In comparison with other industrialized countries, the United States spends three to six times as much money on specialist doctors.

There are many factors that tie into the rise of health insurance costs, including things like medical billing fraud and an aging population, so check out this informative infographic to learn more about what really drives up those premiums.

Why is Health Insurance So Expensive

 

US Healthcare: an oxymoron

October 19, 2012 in Health Insurance, Hospital Bills, Insurance Bills, Medical Care, Medical Debt

It was very exciting to read about Amanda’s grass roots Twitter research.  Amanda, you have started an activist conversation that we, the people, need to have.  Comments from so many people on what Amanda started touched on a deep and growing moral and economic issue for which we must demand answers: loss of a job means loss of insurance, medical debt, loss of shelter and bankruptcy is not a rarity, unaffordable insurance premiums as the norm for the middle class, poor medical care for the disenfranchised, etc.  I will add another observation.  Do you know that if you have a very serious mental illness, have MassHealth, and need to be in hospital, you may wait 2-3 days in an ER for a bed?  Or, if you have poor insurance, be treated in the ER, and when you are medicated and are saner, sent home? There also were a couple of comments from folks who wanted to know why the US did not have systems of care like The UK and Canada.  People want to move to Vermont where there is a progressive move toward single payer healthcare for everybody.  There IS an organization in the US committed to healthcare for all. PNHP was started by public health physicians in 1985!

Does anyone wonder why there is no political will in the US? PNHP started in 1985 with the inception of “managed care”, also viewed by many of us as for-profit healthcare. In this case “healthcare” is an oxymoron, isn’t it? Read the rest of this entry →

Practice is Proactive in Patient Relationships

August 25, 2012 in health care costs, Health Insurance, Medical Care

The Commonwealth Fund’s 2010 study found that almost 50% of US adults were either underinsured or uninsured.  This is a 7% increase from 2007 for the underinsured population. It used to be that having coverage was simply enough. Today, however, having the right type of coverage and amount are key factors in choosing a plan. What happens when you don’t have coverage for a specific procedure? One forward thinking practice in the Chicagoland area takes the time to explain your options and provides the cash discount rate – up front. Before you even ask. That’s mightily refreshing given the lack of communication in many healthcare organizations. And, it’s a win win for both parties. The practice receives a bill paid in full without expending additional dollars in the collections process and the patient is educated a little bit more on how the billing and insurance process works. Let’s hope that more practices implement this customer service level in the near future.

Beware of Balance Billing in Hospital Bills

May 12, 2012 in health care costs, Health Insurance, Hospital Bills, Insurance Bills

Balance billing occurs when a healthcare provider bills a patient for some or the entire amount that should have been declared an insurance discount (contractual allowance). The fact that Prime Healthcare Services in California recently settled a suit for $1.2 million and discontinued the practice suggests that this is a problem. In fact, several states have statutes that prohibit balance billing.

How do you tell if you’ve been balanced billed? First, you have to determine if your treatment was performed by an in or out-of-network healthcare professional. Then, you have to check your EOB (Explanation of Benefits).

In- Network

Check an erroneous charge simply by seeing if the bill for the service exceeds the amount on the EOB. If it does, let your insurance company know and let them handle it.

Out-of-Network (OON)

There are two scenarios:

  • If you have an OON benefit, the OON deductible and co-insurance will apply first. The insurance company pays the balance above that like always. However, if the provider billed you for more than the deductible and co-insurance you may be the victim of a scam. Check the EOB. Did insurance pay the provider? If so, report it. It’s a scam and it is wrong.
  • If you do not have an OON benefit and accidentally got treated by the provider, tell them you want to be treated like an uninsured patient. A standard discount will be applied.

When in doubt, check with a medical bill advocate.

Before the Affordable Health Care Act, Were You Locked Out?

March 17, 2012 in health care costs, Health Insurance, Hospital Bills, Insurance Bills, Medicare

Locked out of medical care, that is. Who? Individuals with pre-existing conditions. Now, 50,000 of them have healthcare coverage via the Pre-Existing Condition Insurance Plan (PCIP) in their state. This is a temporary high-risk health insurance program that makes healthcare not only available but much more affordable.

For example, a patient named Deborah fell victim to a back injury. It left her unemployed and unable to afford health insurance premiums. However, when she discovered the Michigan PCIP plan, she was able to enroll in it, receive the back surgery she needed and get on the road to recovery.

PCIP makes a difference. It has allowed many Americans to get connected to health insurance and receive the medical care they sorely need. That’s because PCIP enrollees can receive that care immediately.

The Affordable Health Care Act has also helped students up to age 26 receive coverage and assisted seniors by allowing access to more affordable prescription drugs.

You can see how your state administers PCIP by clicking here.