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What is Being Done About Medical Billing Fraud?

November 19, 2012 in health care costs, Health Insurance, Insurance Bills, Medical Care, Member Stories

Over the last few years, healthcare insurers have been focusing on fraud detection. Their efforts have been undertaken with the cooperation of the National Health Care Anti-Fraud Association (NHCAA). The increasing numbers of suspected fraudulent medical claims are related to the economy, legislative attempts to help the consumer and general changes in ethical behavior. Also, a real danger exists because when medical service providers and attorneys are working in cahoots with fraudsters, prescribed treatment can be unnecessary and may even cause harm to patients.

The property and casualty insurance industry is also stepping up to implement fraud control. That’s because a significant amount of healthcare fraud starts with an incident related to property casualty insurance. For example, in the New York City area, about one in five no-fault auto insurance claims appear to contain elements of fraud. In addition, as much as one in three claims appear to be inflated.

Recently the National Insurance Crime Bureau (NCIB) asked leading property/casualty insurers to participate in a project to analyze medical billing data and place it in a single database. It is hoped that the ongoing participation of these insurers on supplying data for this project will enable the industry to be aware of emerging trends regarding potential fraud around medical billing. Read the rest of this entry →

US Healthcare: an oxymoron

October 19, 2012 in Health Insurance, Hospital Bills, Insurance Bills, Medical Care, Medical Debt

It was very exciting to read about Amanda’s grass roots Twitter research.  Amanda, you have started an activist conversation that we, the people, need to have.  Comments from so many people on what Amanda started touched on a deep and growing moral and economic issue for which we must demand answers: loss of a job means loss of insurance, medical debt, loss of shelter and bankruptcy is not a rarity, unaffordable insurance premiums as the norm for the middle class, poor medical care for the disenfranchised, etc.  I will add another observation.  Do you know that if you have a very serious mental illness, have MassHealth, and need to be in hospital, you may wait 2-3 days in an ER for a bed?  Or, if you have poor insurance, be treated in the ER, and when you are medicated and are saner, sent home? There also were a couple of comments from folks who wanted to know why the US did not have systems of care like The UK and Canada.  People want to move to Vermont where there is a progressive move toward single payer healthcare for everybody.  There IS an organization in the US committed to healthcare for all. PNHP was started by public health physicians in 1985!

Does anyone wonder why there is no political will in the US? PNHP started in 1985 with the inception of “managed care”, also viewed by many of us as for-profit healthcare. In this case “healthcare” is an oxymoron, isn’t it? Read the rest of this entry →

Will Medicare Changes Result in Better Quality?

September 3, 2012 in health care costs, Health Insurance, Hospital Bills, Insurance Bills, Medical Care, Medical Debt, Medicare

As the price of health care in America keeps rising, you may be among those that are frustrated by the kind of generic approach taken by  health insurance companies and government entitlement programs. The traditional fee-for-service format of health care reimbursement means that the best hospitals and doctor’s offices don’t get rewarded and the lower performing offices don’t have consequences. But, this is all likely to change with new Medicare rules that are slated to pursue more of a ‘meritocracy’ in the way that health care dollars get paid out.

New Medicare Rules

Reports from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services show that Medicare is going to begin making some changes in the way that it reimburses health care providers starting late this year. In what Medicare officials call a ‘value-based purchasing’ program, Medicare will consider various aspects of a provider’s operations in setting the reimbursement rates for that particular office. Key factors will include observation of outcomes, or in other words, whether the procedures and services performed at an office actually help patients to recover from illnesses and improve quality of life.

Responses to the Changes

For you, this represents a major change and a big potential edge in making sure you get what you deserve for the money, especially when you have out of pocket expenses. On the downside, though, some providers are arguing that hospitals and offices in rural areas, or those with other significant disadvantages, may be punished unfairly. Read the rest of this entry →

How Much is Health Insurance Coverage Really Costing You?

August 30, 2012 in health care costs, Health Insurance, Hospital Bills, Insurance Bills, Medical Care, Medical Debt, Medicare

Just when you think you have the health care business figured out, new reports come out showing even more dark details about how American patients are simply charged massive amounts of money for health care services on a pretty arbitrary basis.

The newest wrinkle in this story actually turns the conventional wisdom about payment for health care on its ear: where many assume that most uninsured patients get the highest bills, new reports are showing that, in many cases, the “cash-up-front” deals given to cash-paying patients may be as little as less than half of a contractually agreed price that the hospital would bill the insurance company. Why is this a problem? Because it means that many of those who pay high deductibles, premiums and coinsurance on a health plan may still be paying more for each service, visit or procedure than someone who doesn’t have any insurance at all. It also injects a huge monkey wrench into the now established idea that everyone needs health insurance to make health care affordable. On the flip side, if you have a high deductible but choose to self-pay a medical bill, how will you ever meet your deductible? This is particularly troublesome should you have a catastrophic event. Read the rest of this entry →

Practice is Proactive in Patient Relationships

August 25, 2012 in health care costs, Health Insurance, Medical Care

The Commonwealth Fund’s 2010 study found that almost 50% of US adults were either underinsured or uninsured.  This is a 7% increase from 2007 for the underinsured population. It used to be that having coverage was simply enough. Today, however, having the right type of coverage and amount are key factors in choosing a plan. What happens when you don’t have coverage for a specific procedure? One forward thinking practice in the Chicagoland area takes the time to explain your options and provides the cash discount rate – up front. Before you even ask. That’s mightily refreshing given the lack of communication in many healthcare organizations. And, it’s a win win for both parties. The practice receives a bill paid in full without expending additional dollars in the collections process and the patient is educated a little bit more on how the billing and insurance process works. Let’s hope that more practices implement this customer service level in the near future.

Challenging Rejected Health Insurance Claims

August 5, 2012 in health care costs, Health Insurance, Hospital Bills, Insurance Bills, Medical Debt

According to the AHA (American Hospital Association), 87% of hospitals expect bad medical debt to continue to grow.  And it’s no wonder with situations like a very common one experienced by patients across the nation. You are seen by your healthcare provider for a service or procedure that should be covered under your insurance plan per plan benefits. However, when the Explanation of Benefits is received from the insurance carrier, charges have been denied for coverage. What happened?

Reimbursement is based on a few key areas including plan benefits and coverage period, medical necessity, correct patient information, diagnosis code, and procedure/service code (CPT), etc. An incorrect key stroke can cause your claim to be rejected. Or, an erroneous code can result in zero dollars paid. What can you do?

Begin by appealing the rejection to your doctor and the insurance company. As described above, it may have been a simple clerical error that caused charges to be dismissed. In other situations, you want to confirm that the CPT and diagnosis codes are cross referenced. What may have happened is that the CPT code did not support the diagnosis or the reverse. Codes are chosen based on the physician’s notes, documentation, and national coding guidelines. Sometimes, the CPT code may not be specific enough or it may have incorrectly described the level of care. Most insurance companies have their own unique process and timeline for appeal submissions.

If you’ve exhausted your appeal efforts and your claim remains unpaid, you may want to file a complaint with your state’s health insurance commissioner and or enlist a medical bill advocate to navigate the process for you. Whichever route you choose, be persistent, professional, and follow through.

Maintain Open Communication with Medical Bill Debt

July 14, 2012 in health care costs, Health Insurance, Hospital Bills, Insurance Bills, Medical Care, Medical Debt

The Affordable Care Act is cracking down on some of the most aggressive ways that hospitals categorized as charitable or nonprofit facilities for tax exemption can seek to shake money out of patients. Reports of the new laws also often offer some of the most common advice to protect you and your family from unfair or excessive medical debt.

Always Talk to Your Providers

One of the biggest pieces of advice is to always ask up front about available charity and financial assistance programs. It’s a great idea to ask about health care costs, and detail payment options, before you sign up for any given course of treatment. But beyond this, dialogue with the provider is also a key to keeping medical bills from showing up on credit reports. It’s true that even with the best back channel dialogue, some hospital administrators will still send bills to collections, but having an open communication with the provider will prevent this in the majority of cases where reasonable financial offices simply ask that patients keep in touch about their debt and pay to the best of their ability.

Make Sure You Are Covered

Essentially, the Affordable Care Act can be seen as a double-edged sword – depending on what side of the table you are on. Read the rest of this entry →

Medical Claim Error Rates Decline According to Latest Report Card

June 24, 2012 in health care costs, Health Insurance, News

News from the medical industry shows that the American Medical Association or AMA is working with private health insurers to lower the rates of medical billing errors within the American healthcare system. For a while now, the AMA has been talking about a collaborative effort to make medical billing more efficient, and it seems that this initiative is starting to pay off, according to this year’s National Health Insurers Report Card, an annual report released by the AMA to document national trends.

Overall Error Rates for Medical Claims

The new report shows inaccuracies for private health insurer payments dropping from nearly 20% in 2011 to just under 10% in 2012. The AMA claims that this 50% reduction has saved the industry over $8 billion, and that there’s a lot more potential for improvement. In a press release this month, AMA Board Chairman Robert M. Wah is quoted as saying that first-time accuracy in medical claim payments “saves precious healthcare dollars and frees physicians from needless administrative tasks” – that’s the idea behind these sorts of efforts to increase accuracy. These improvements help physician offices manage revenue cycles, while they also help you to understand your financial responsibility and contribute to greater transparency in the healthcare market.

Other Numbers

The National Health Insurer Report Card also provide some other assessments of this year’s trends within the medical industry. While the report shows improved response times for medical claim payments, and indicates greater transparency by health insurance companies, it also shows that medical claim denials are now on the rise. The AMA sites a prior decline between 2008 and 2011 that was reversed this year with an increase of nearly 70%. This increase, according to the AMA report, was across the board, as all major insurers declined many more claims than they had the previous year. Denials will be an issue that third party medical advocates and others will continue to evaluate in order to make sure that you are getting a fair shake when it comes to your healthcare costs.

We face a lot of challenges in identifying and controlling our health care costs. Keep informed on what’s happening in the health care industry as it affects you.

Are You Being Treated by a Subcontracted Doctor?

May 28, 2012 in health care costs, Health Insurance, Hospital Bills, Insurance Bills, Medical Care, Medicare

A recent story from Dayton, Ohio, caught our attention, where according to news reports, some patients remain responsible for emergency room charges when a hospital happens to ‘subcontract’  doctors who may not accept health insurance at all. This adds another layer to the oftentimes confusing in network vs. out of network debate. In many cases, especially in an emergency situation, patients who visit a local hospital or facility may experience unexpected costs after they are cared for by a doctor who may not be ‘in their network’, even if the facility itself is listed as an in network provider. There’s been a lot of discussion whether this, which may seem deceptive, especially to those without specialized knowledge in the medical billing and health insurance field, is fair. In fact, state officials, like in New York, are  looking to pass legislation which mandates better transparency for out of network charges. Taking the time to understand your health insurance plan and what defines a covered provider or facility can save you hundreds if not thousands of dollars in non-covered charges.

It seems providers tend to respond to these scenarios in two ways: Some indicate they will change their policies to include more transparency while others claim to be bound by federal laws that do not allow them to reveal to patients whether an on-call doctor or a physician on shift will accept their insurance or not.

We find the second argument to be completely unacceptable at face value. In fact, it’s reasonable that consumer advocates would expect state regulators to crack down on these well documented examples of seemingly unfair provisions in delivering medical services. It’s not outside the realm of possibility that a patient facing bankruptcy after a bill like this would have a basis for legal appeal, especially as new legislation is introduced and passed. It’s vitally important that you discuss your options and ask questions before treatment to minimize impact to your financial future. How prepared are you in the event of an emergency room visit?

Beware of Balance Billing in Hospital Bills

May 12, 2012 in health care costs, Health Insurance, Hospital Bills, Insurance Bills

Balance billing occurs when a healthcare provider bills a patient for some or the entire amount that should have been declared an insurance discount (contractual allowance). The fact that Prime Healthcare Services in California recently settled a suit for $1.2 million and discontinued the practice suggests that this is a problem. In fact, several states have statutes that prohibit balance billing.

How do you tell if you’ve been balanced billed? First, you have to determine if your treatment was performed by an in or out-of-network healthcare professional. Then, you have to check your EOB (Explanation of Benefits).

In- Network

Check an erroneous charge simply by seeing if the bill for the service exceeds the amount on the EOB. If it does, let your insurance company know and let them handle it.

Out-of-Network (OON)

There are two scenarios:

  • If you have an OON benefit, the OON deductible and co-insurance will apply first. The insurance company pays the balance above that like always. However, if the provider billed you for more than the deductible and co-insurance you may be the victim of a scam. Check the EOB. Did insurance pay the provider? If so, report it. It’s a scam and it is wrong.
  • If you do not have an OON benefit and accidentally got treated by the provider, tell them you want to be treated like an uninsured patient. A standard discount will be applied.

When in doubt, check with a medical bill advocate.

25 Million Americans Underinsured Including Middle and Upper Income Families

April 18, 2012 in health care costs, Health Insurance, Hospital Bills, Insurance Bills, Medical Debt, Medicare

As current government initiatives wrestle with the issue of millions of uninsured Americans facing potential medical bankruptcy, new studies are revealing that it’s not just the uninsured who are at risk. The issue of underinsured American individuals and families is becoming a major part of today’s healthcare conversation and alerting many more Americans to the dangers that they face, even if they have access to affordable health insurance policies.

Current statistics show a startling trend, where being underinsured is becoming a common way to fall into extreme medical debt and eventual bankruptcy or bad credit situations. Research by the Commonwealth Fund that appeared in recent industry journals shows that America’s underinsured community has doubled in the past four years to over 25 million people. While the highest number of underinsured Americans are in the income range below the poverty level, research shows that middle and upper income families are being affected in larger numbers each year. Research also shows that some individuals with what others would consider healthy annual incomes are still very likely to become underinsured in the immediate future.

In general, being underinsured has to do with the cost of one’s medical bills against that person’s annual income. Read the rest of this entry →